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Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)  IMDB   
Genre Comedy/Black Comedy MPAA G
Director Stanley Kubrick Rating
Writer Peter George Runtime 90 minutes
Producer Type Movie
Cinematographer Gilbert Taylor Format DVD
Studio Columbia Pictures Disk No. 1/1
Language English Edition
Country USA UPC
Color Black and White    
Plot Summary

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In 1964, with the Cuban Missile Crisis fresh in viewers' minds, the Cold War at its frostiest, and the hydrogen bomb relatively new and frightening, Stanley Kubrick dared to make a film about what could happen if the wrong person pushed the wrong button --- and played the situation for laughs. Dr. Strangelove's jet-black satire (from a script by director Stanley Kubrick, Peter George, and Terry Southern) and a host of superb comic performances (including three from Peter Sellers) have kept the film fresh and entertaining, even as its issues have become (slightly) less timely. Loaded with thermonuclear weapons, a U.S. bomber piloted by Maj. T.J. "King" Kong (Slim Pickens) is on a routine flight pattern near the Soviet Union when they recieve orders to commence Wing Attack Plan R, best summarized by Maj. Kong as "Nuclear combat! Toe to toe with the Russkies!" On the ground at Burpleson Air Force Base, Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake (Peter Sellers) notices nothing on the news about America being at war. Gen. Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) calmly informs him that he gave the command to attack the Soviet Union because it was high time someone did something about fluoridation, which is sapping Americans' bodily fluids (and apparently has something to do with Ripper's sexual dysfunction). Meanwhile, President Merkin Muffley (Sellers again) meets with his top Pentagon advisors, including superhawk Gen. Buck Turgidson (George C. Scott), who sees this as an opportunity to do something about Communism in general and Russians in particular. However, the ante is upped considerably when Soviet ambassador DeSadesky (Peter Bull) informs Muffley and his staff of the latest innovation in Soviet weapons technology: a "Doomsday Machine" which will destroy the entire world if the Russians are attacked. --- Mark Deming
Actor / Character

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Peter Sellers ..... President Merkin Muffley
Peter Sellers ..... Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake
Peter Sellers ..... Dr. Strangelove
George C. Scott ..... Gen. Buck Turgidson
Sterling Hayden ..... Gen. Jack D. Ripper
Keenan Wynn ..... Col. Bat Guano
Slim Pickens ..... Maj. T.J. "King" Kong
Peter Bull ..... Ambassador de Sadesky
James Earl Jones ..... Lt. Lothar Zogg
Tracy Reed ..... Miss Scott
Jack Creley ..... Mr. Staines
Frank Berry ..... Lt. H.R. Dietrich, DSO
Glenn Beck ..... Lt. W.D. Kivel
Shane Rimmer ..... Capt. G.A. "Ace" Owens
Gordon Tanner ..... Gen. Faceman
Robert O'Neil ..... Adm. Randolph
Roy Stephens ..... Frank
Laurence Herder ..... Burpelson Defense Team Member
John McCarthy ..... On Defense Team
Hal Galili ..... Members of the Defense Team
Paul Tamarin ..... Lt. B. Goldberg
Awards

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(1964) Academy - Best Actor (nom) ..... Peter Sellers
(1964) Academy - Best Adapted Screenplay (nom) ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) Academy - Best Adapted Screenplay (nom) ..... Peter George
(1964) Academy - Best Adapted Screenplay (nom) ..... Terry Southern
(1964) Academy - Best Director (nom) ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) Academy - Best Picture (nom) .....
(1964) British Academy Awards - Best British Film (win) ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) British Academy Awards - Best Film - Any Source (win) ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) Directors Guild of America - Best Director (nom) ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Actor ..... George C. Scott
(1964) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Actor ..... Sterling Hayden
(1964) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Direction (win) ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Film ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1964) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Film ..... Stanley Kubrick
(1989) Library of Congress - U.S. National Film Registry (win) .....
(1998) American Film Institute - 100 Greatest American Movies (win) .....
Review

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Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is widely regarded as the screen's greatest satire, a film that superbly encapsulates the fear and paranoia of the Cold War. There is not a sequence in the film in which the dialogue is not quotable --- indeed, there are so many well-remembered moments that viewers and critics will differ on the best, though surely the sight of Major Kong (Slim Pickens) waving his cowboy hat as he rides the bomb into oblivion is among the most enduring images of its era. As was consistently the case in his career, director Stanley Kubrick brilliantly matches actors with their roles, from Peter Sellers's three-character performance to the screen debut of James Earl Jones, whom Kubrick had spotted in a stage play. Similarly, George C. Scott, who plays the hawkish general Buck Turgidsdon, considered Strangelove among his greatest screen achievements. Every performance is top-notch, and many Kubrick trademarks can be found in the film, from the visual style to the shift to a hand-held camera when the Air Force base is attacked to the sparse and ironic use of music. --- Richard Gilliam

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