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Lawrence of Arabia (1962)  IMDB   
Genre Adventure/War MPAA PG (Parental Guidance)
Director David Lean Rating
Writer T.E. Lawrence Runtime 227 minutes
Producer Sam Spiegel Type Movie
Cinematographer Freddie Young Format DVD
Studio Columbia Pictures Disk No. 1/1
Language English Edition
Country UK UPC
Color Color    
Plot Summary

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A biography of T.E.Lawrence. The young lieutenant Lawrence manages to get a job as an observer with Prince Feisal, the leader of an Arab tribal army. Lawrence decides to stay and help Feisal. His adventures are detailed by Jackson Bentley, a journalist.

Summary written by: Colin Tinto {cst@imdb.com}
Actor / Character

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Peter O'Toole ..... T.E. Lawrence
Alec Guinness ..... Prince Feisal
Anthony Quinn ..... Auda abu Tayi
Jack Hawkins ..... General Allenby
Omar Sharif ..... Sherif Ali Ibn El Kharish
Josť Ferrer ..... Turkish Bey
Anthony Quayle ..... Colonel Harry Brighton
Claude Rains ..... Mr. Dryden
Arthur Kennedy (I) ..... Jackson Bentley
Donald Wolfit ..... General Murray
I.S. Johar ..... Gasim
Gamil Ratib ..... Majid
Michel Ray ..... Farraj
John Dimech ..... Daud
Zia Mohyeddin ..... Tafas
Awards

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(1962) Academy - Best Actor (nom) ..... Peter O'Toole
(1962) Academy - Best Adapted Screenplay (nom) ..... Robert Bolt
(1962) Academy - Best Art Direction (win) ..... John Box
(1962) Academy - Best Art Direction (win) ..... John Stoll
(1962) Academy - Best Art Direction (win) ..... Dario Simoni
(1962) Academy - Best Cinematography (win) ..... Freddie Young
(1962) Academy - Best Director (win) ..... David Lean
(1962) Academy - Best Editing (win) ..... Anne V. Coates
(1962) Academy - Best Picture (win) .....
(1962) Academy - Best Score (win) ..... Maurice Jarre
(1962) Academy - Best Sound (win) ..... John Cox (Shepperton Studio Sound Department)
(1962) Academy - Best Supporting Actor (nom) ..... Omar Sharif
(1962) British Academy Awards - Best British Actor (win) ..... Peter O'Toole
(1962) British Academy Awards - Best Film - Both Any Source and British (win) ..... David Lean
(1962) British Academy Awards - Best Screenplay (win) ..... Robert Bolt
(1962) Directors Guild of America - Best Director ..... David Lean
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Actor - Drama (nom) ..... Peter O'Toole
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Actor - Drama (nom) ..... Anthony Quinn
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Cinematography - Color (win) ..... Freddie Young
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Director (win) ..... David Lean
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Original Score (nom) ..... Maurice Jarre
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Picture - Drama (win) .....
(1962) Golden Globe - Best Supporting Actor (win) ..... Omar Sharif
(1962) Golden Globe - New Star of the Year - Male (nom) ..... Peter O'Toole
(1962) Golden Globe - New Star of the Year - Male (win) ..... Omar Sharif
(1962) National Board of Review of Motion Pict - 10 Best Films .....
(1962) National Board of Review of Motion Pict - Best Director (win) .....
(1991) Library of Congress - U.S. National Film Registry (win) .....
(1998) American Film Institute - 100 Greatest American Movies (win) .....
Review

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More of a sensory explosion than a simple movie, Lawrence of Arabia is epic in every sense of the word. Its images---of the desert, of the blinding sun, of Peter O'Toole's golden hair and staggeringly blue eyes---are some of the most memorable ever committed to celluloid, and its musical score remains almost unparalleled in its ability to evoke so many associations with a few simple notes. A richly detailed character portrait rather than a biography or an adventure film, Lawrence is the tale of a man at the mercy of both the desert and his own grand ambitions. As played by O'Toole in a star-making performance, Lawrence was a man whose character was defined as much by sexual ambivalence and thorny enigma as by his considerable vision and will --- in other words, a conflicted, fascinating figure whose personality tended both to inspire and to eclipse his cause. It is fitting that a man larger than life should have his story presented as an epic, and equally fitting that this epic is set in the desert, the only stage magnificent and unforgiving enough to showcase Lawrence's persona. Lawrence of Arabia is almost as remarkable for the story behind it as for the story visible on the screen. Director David Lean's handling of his material is legendary, from days spent on location waiting for the "right" sunrise to his staging of several key scenes, most notably that of the desert mirage that slowly evolves from speck to man. That shot alone could have made the film a legend, conveying the mystery, brutality, and scope of the desert just by remaining still and silent. Lean's respect for the desert is evident in every scene: rather than attempting to manipulate it, he lets it speak for itself. The result is one of the cinema's most iconic visual feasts, perhaps even more so because it was one of the last films to be shot in 70mm (as opposed to being blown up to 70mm from 35mm). Restored and re-released in 1989, 27 years after its initial release, Lawrence was still as beautiful and turbulent as its title character, stunning new and old viewers alike. --- Rebecca Flint

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