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The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)  IMDB   
Genre Adventure/Drama MPAA NR
Director John Huston Rating
Writer B. Traven Runtime 126 minutes
Producer Henry Blanke Type Movie
Cinematographer Ted D. McCord Format DVD
Studio Warner Brothers Disk No. 1/1
Language English Edition Special Edition
Country USA UPC
Color Black and White    
Plot Summary

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John Huston's 1948 treasure-hunt classic begins as drifter Fred C. Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart), down and out in Tampico, Mexico, impulsively spends his last bit of dough on a lottery ticket. Later on, Dobbs and fellow indigent Curtin (Tim Holt) seek shelter in a cheap flophouse and meet Howard (Walter Huston), a toothless, garrulous old coot who regales them with stories about prospecting for gold. Forcibly collecting their pay from their shifty boss, Dobbs and Curtin combine this money with Dobbs's unexpected windfall from a lottery ticket and, together with Howard, buy the tools for a prospecting expedition. Dobbs has pledged that anything they dig up will be split three ways, but Howard, who's heard that song before, doesn't quite swallow this. As the gold is mined and measured, Dobbs grows increasingly paranoid and distrustful, and the men gradually turn against each other on the way toward a bitterly ironic conclusion. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is a superior morality play and one of the best movie treatments of the corrosiveness of greed. Huston keeps a typically light and entertaining touch despite the strong theme, for which he won Oscars for both Director and Screenplay, as well as a supporting award for his father Walter, making Walter, John, and Anjelica Huston the only three generations of one family all to win Oscars. --- Hal Erickson
Actor / Character

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Humphrey Bogart ..... Fred C. Dobbs
Walter Huston ..... Howard
Tim Holt ..... Curtin
Bruce Bennett ..... Cody
Barton MacLane ..... McCormick
Alfonso Bedoya ..... Gold Hat
Arturo Soto Rangel ..... Presidente
Manuel Donde ..... El Jefe
Jacqueline Dalya ..... Flashy Girl
Margarito Luna ..... Pancho
Harry Vejar ..... Bartender
Ann Sheridan ..... Senorita Lopez
Josť Torvay ..... Pablo
Julian Rivero ..... Barber
Clifton Young ..... Flophouse Bum
Roberto Canedo ..... Mexican Lieutenant
Spencer Chan ..... Proprietor
Robert Blake ..... Mexican Boy
John Huston ..... White Suit
Jack Holt ..... Flophouse Man
Ralph Dunn ..... Flophouse Bum
Martin Garralaga ..... Railroad Conductor
Pat Flaherty ..... Customer
Awards

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(1948) Academy - Best Director (win) ..... John Huston
(1948) Academy - Best Original Screenplay (nom) ..... John Huston
(1948) Academy - Best Picture (nom) .....
(1948) Academy - Best Supporting Actor (win) ..... Walter Huston
(1948) Film Daily - 10 Best Films (win) .....
(1948) Golden Globe - Best Director (win) ..... John Huston
(1948) Golden Globe - Best Picture (win) .....
(1948) Golden Globe - Best Supporting Actor (win) ..... Walter Huston
(1948) National Board of Review of Motion Pict - 10 Best Films .....
(1948) National Board of Review of Motion Pict - 10 Best Films (win) .....
(1948) National Board of Review of Motion Pict - Best Actor (win) .....
(1948) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Actor ..... Walter Huston
(1948) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Direction (win) ..... John Huston
(1948) New York Film Critics Circle - Best Picture (win) .....
(1948) New York Times - 10 Best Films (win) .....
(1948) Venice Film Festival - Best Picture (win) .....
(1948) Venice Film Festival - Competing Film ..... John Huston
(1948) Venice Film Festival - Musical Comment (win) ..... Max Steiner
(1949) British Academy Awards - Best Film - Any Source ..... John Huston
(1990) Library of Congress - U.S. National Film Registry (win) .....
(1998) American Film Institute - 100 Greatest American Movies (win) .....
Review

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Loosely based on the Biblical parable of the thieves and the "Pardoner's Tale" in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, John Huston's morality tale is one of the great cinematic proofs of the Biblical adage radix malorum est cupitidas, or, the root of evil is the love of money. The film is a clever study of the erosive effect that money can have on flawed men's characters. Shot entirely on location in Mexico, the film's dry and dusty atmosphere is clearly authentic. Humphrey Bogart's maniacal Fred Dobbs is one of moviedom's great characterizations, a conglomeration of cunning, greed and paranoia. As his wealth mounts, so does his distrust. While external threats abound, the real enemy lies within. The Treasure of the Sierre Madre examines the essential existential hopelessness and loneliness of the avaricious man, drawing an implicit parallel between the prospectors and man's contemporary pursuit of material wealth. A failure with audiences who apparently didn't want to see Bogie playing such a nefarious anti-hero, the movie is now recognized by most critics as an American classic: AFI voted it #30 on the list of 100 all time great American films, while for the first time ever, a father and son --- John (for directing and screenplay) and Walter Huston (for best supporting actor) --- won Oscars for their stellar work. --- Dan Jardine

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