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Treasure Island (1950)  IMDB   Website
Genre Adventure/Action MPAA G (General Audience)
Director Byron Haskin Rating
Writer Robert Louis Stevenson Runtime 96 minutes
Producer Perce Pearce Type Movie
Cinematographer Freddie Young Format DVD
Studio RKO Radio Pictures / Walt Disney Productions Disk No. 1/1
Language English Edition
Country UK UPC
Color Color    
Plot Summary

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Young Jim Hawkins is caught up with the pirate Long John Silver in search of the buried treasure of the buccaneer Captain Flint, in this adaptation of the classic novel by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Summary written by: Jim Beaver {jumblejim@prodigy.net}
Actor / Character

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Bobby Driscoll ..... Jim Hawkins
Robert Newton ..... Long John Silver
Basil Sydney ..... Captain Smollett
Walter Fitzgerald ..... Squire Trelawney
Denis O'Dea ..... Dr. Livesey
Finlay Currie ..... Capt. Billy Bones
Ralph Truman ..... George Merry
Geoffrey Keen ..... Israel Hands
Geoffrey Wilkinson (II) ..... Ben Gunn
John Laurie (I) ..... Blind Pew
Francis De Wolff ..... Black Dog
David Davies (II) ..... Mr. Arrow
John Gregson ..... Redruth
Andrew Blackett ..... Gray
William Devlin ..... Morgan
Awards

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(1952) Berlin International Film Festival - Competing Film ..... Byron Haskin
Review

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The most popular and often-filmed of all pirate adventure stories is this Robert Louis Stevenson classic. It was filmed by MGM in 1934 and remade several times, but no version was more memorable than the 1950 Walt Disney effort. As Disney pictures go, Treasure Island was rather daring, with so much spectacle and violence that some of the battle sequences had to be edited out in some versions. At the heart of the film's appeal was the unique performance of Robert Newton as villain Long John Silver. Newton's combination of swagger, cruelty, and foppishness gives the film needed weight, since so much of the suspense depends on the young protagonist's fear and loathing of his nemesis. Many a young child's nightmares were filled with Newton's characterization of Silver, and Treasure Island was a prime example of the criticism that Disney's successful pictures depend as much on instilling fear as on providing comfort. --- Michael Betzold

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